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The Most Inaccurate Quarterbacks in NFL History: A Statistical Review

When it comes to quarterback play in the NFL, accuracy is a fundamental attribute that often distinguishes the elite from the mediocre. Although completion percentage isn’t the sole indicator of a quarterback’s skill, it provides a clear window into their precision and decision-making abilities. This ranking focuses on the quarterbacks who, in a particular season, struggled the most with accuracy based on their completion percentages. Here’s a look at the most inaccurate QBs in NFL history, by season.

  1. Doug Williams (Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1980)
    Leading the list is Doug Williams with a completion rate of just 48.8%. In the 1980 season, Williams attempted 521 passes for the Buccaneers. Despite his low accuracy, Williams is remembered for his remarkable performance in Super Bowl XXII with the Washington Redskins, proving that a single season’s stats don’t define a player’s entire career.
  2. Drew Bledsoe (New England Patriots, 1995)
    Drew Bledsoe, a name that resonates with Patriots fans, had a challenging 1995 season, completing only 50.8% of his passes from 636 attempts. Despite this, Bledsoe had a successful career and was instrumental in the Patriots’ turnaround in the mid-90s.
  3. Jay Schroeder (Washington Redskins, 1986)
    Schroeder had a completion percentage of 51.0% in 1986, completing 541 passes for the Redskins. Although not the most precise passer that season, Schroeder led Washington to the NFC Championship Game, demonstrating that accuracy isn’t the only measure of a quarterback’s effectiveness.
  4. George Blanda (Houston Oilers, 1964)
    The oldest quarterback on the list, George Blanda, had a completion percentage of 51.9% at the age of 37. In the 1964 season, he threw 505 passes for the Houston Oilers. Blanda is better known for his longevity in the game, playing well into his 40s.
  5. Eli Manning (New York Giants, 2005)
    Eli Manning, with a 52.8% completion rate from 557 attempts in the 2005 season, had his struggles but also had a career filled with clutch performances, including two Super Bowl MVP awards.
  6. Cam Newton (Carolina Panthers, 2016)
    Cam Newton’s 2016 season saw him complete just 52.9% of his 510 attempts. Despite this, Newton is often celebrated for his dual-threat capabilities and his MVP season in 2015.
  7. Chris Miller (Atlanta Falcons, 1989)
    Chris Miller managed a 53.2% completion rate on 526 attempts during the 1989 season. Miller’s time in the NFL was marred by injuries, which inevitably affected his performance.
  8. Kerry Collins (Oakland Raiders, 2005)
    In the same year as Manning, Kerry Collins completed 53.5% of his passes from 565 attempts. Collins played for several teams during his career and had moments of excellence despite the inconsistency shown in the 2005 season.
  9. Brian Sipe (Cleveland Browns, 1979)
    Matching Collins’s completion percentage but with fewer attempts, Brian Sipe also had a 53.5% rate in 1979 with 535 attempts. Sipe is remembered for his MVP season in 1980, which contrasts with his lower accuracy in the prior season.
  10. Dave Krieg (Seattle Seahawks, 1985)
    Rounding out the list is Dave Krieg, with a 53.6% completion rate from 532 attempts in 1985. Despite his struggles, Krieg had a productive career and was a three-time Pro Bowler.

In conclusion, while the completion percentages during these seasons were less than stellar for these quarterbacks, it is important to consider the context of each player’s career. Quarterbacks can have off years, but many on this list have also experienced significant successes in the NFL. Accuracy is just one part of the quarterbacking puzzle, and as history shows, it doesn’t always tell the whole story.

Listicled Staff
Listicled Staffhttps://listicled.com
Listicled staff covers everything from sports to entertainment, politics to parenting, and everything in-between.
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